Monday, 17 August 2020

Singabout - Journal of Australian Folksong, Volume 2(2), September 1957

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1.   Singabout, Volume 2(2), September 1957 - cover,  Joe Cashmere

2.   Singabout, Volume 2(2), September 1957 - EDITORIAL - offer of a special combined subscription to SINGABOUT, SING (London Youth Choir), & SING OUT (US) Our cover photo - Joseph Cashmere, of Sylvania N.S.W,  retired shearer and teamster who possesses a large fund of old dance tunes and bush songs. One of his tricks is to place his pipe behind the bridge of his fiddle and play an imitation of bagpipes. Mr. Cashmere sometimes accompanies himself on the fiddle when singing, either by bowing or by strumming the fiddle like a ukelele.  CONTENTS. 
SINGABOUTIssued quarterly. Editor John Meredith. Asst editor Alan Scott, Orders & Subscriptions Gay Scott.  Published by Alan Scott.

3.   Singabout, Volume 2(2), September 1957 - The Goondiwindi Song. Leo Dixon, an ex-shearer now working on the Sydney waterfront, taught this song to the editors. Leo picked it up in the northern shearing sheds, and says "There are many more verses which could easily be got in Queensland." The tune is a variant of The Rose Tree, another version of which is used by Sally Sloane for a song called The Praises of Sweet Paddy's Land. The last verse was given to us by Arthur Davis of Cullenbone, N.S.W.

4.   Singabout, Volume 2(2), September 1957 - The Rebirth of Folk Music, by Douglas Kennedy. Director of the English Folk Dance and Song Society.

5.   Singabout, Volume 2(2), September 1957 - The Rebirth of Folk Music (cont). Correction - THE JACARANDA DANCE published in Singabout 1(4) -  The dance was composed by Leith Charlton, President of the Clarence River Folk Lore Association & the Grafton version differs from the one printed ...  Ad for Songs from Lawson, On sale at leading bookshops or from the Bush Music Club.

6.   Singabout, Volume 2(2), September 1957 - Broken Down Squatter. The later 1880's was a period of plenty, both for the bush worker and the man on the land. By 1891, the price of wool had fallen, the squatters were at war with the Shearers' Union in an endeavour to reduce  the rate, and in 1893 the banks crashed. The boom had ended. THE BROKEN DOWN SQUATTER comes from this period in our history, and the version given here has been adapted from the singing of the late Jack (Hoopiron) Lee of Auburn N.S.W.  A retired bullocky and shearer, Jack Lee was the first folk singer recorded by the editor. Other songs he knew were WIDGEEGOWEERA JOE, THE STOCKMAN'S LAST BED, TRAVELLING DOWN THE CASTELREAGH, and THE OLD MAN KANGAROO. The pencil sketch of blind folk singer "Hoopiron Jack" is in the possession of Hilda Lane.

7.  Singabout, Volume 2(2), September 1957 - Broken Down Squatter (cont) 

8.   Singabout, Volume 2(2), September 1957 - NEW BOOKS - Folk Songs of Canada by E.F. Fowke and R. Johnson. Reviewing this book tended to become a review of these songs in it that have also been collected in Australia ... Some verses in the song printed here YE MAIDENS OF ONTARIO closely resemble  the words of THE UNION BOY in Singabout 1(4).

9.   Singabout, Volume 2(2), September 1957 - YE MAIDENS OF ONTARIO (cont). Well-known Mudgee identity Dud Mills is an exponent of the bones and jingling johnny or lagerphone. In our next issue Dud will tell you how to prepare and rattle the bones.

10.  Singabout, Volume 2(2), September 1957 - THE NEUMERELLA SHORE ... When Mr. Thomas Bleakley, of Virginia, Brisbane, was a youth of 16, he learned this song about "free selecting" from the Post Master as Esk, Queensland. He never heard it sung by anyone else, but retained it in his memory until he recorded it for Alan Scott in 1955. Mr. Blakley was then 76 years old ...

11.   Singabout, Volume 2(2), September 1957 - THE NEUMERELLA SHORE (cont)

12.   Singabout, Volume 2(2), September 1957 - MAGGIE MAGGIE MAY. Adapted from a version given to SINGABOUT by Bush Music Club member Ian Beck, of Erskineville, N.S.W.

13.   Singabout, Volume 2(2), September 1957 - CHINESE NATIONAL MUSIC

14.   Singabout, Volume 2(2), September 1957 -   OUT OF OUR MAILBAG - More on Myxo - Stan Wakefield, Panania, N.SW.   CHINESE NATIONAL MUSIC (cont) Ho Lo-Ting, President Shanghai Conservatory of Music. (By kind permission, reprinted from CHINA RECONSTRUCTS)

15.   Singabout, Volume 2(2), September 1957 - Sleeper Cutting in Baradine Bar. Laurie Cooper of Narrabri, N.S.W., wrote this ballad as a protest against his mates who insisted on "talking shop" in the bar. The editors have set it to a traditional tune which is used for several songs - THE GREAT NORTHERN LINE, THE STATION COOK, and THE KNICKERBOCKER LINE, to mention a few.

16.   Singabout, Volume 2(2), September 1957 - Hey don't forget your instrument !!! when you come to the Bush Music Club's workshop night. Every Friday night at 7.30 in the Esparanto Studios. Ennis Road, Milsons Point - right under the station on the Kirribillai side. Three hours of traditional songs & dances - visitors welcome.


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